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    On Earth Day, coalition of groups including Environment Colorado and the CoPIRG Foundation delivered over 6,000 petitions and dozens of letters from elected officials to the Public Utilities Commission (PUC), calling on them to reject a proposal by Xcel Energy to scale back their energy savings programs. At stake is $600 million in savings for Xcel’s approximately 1.4 million customers.


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    On Earth Day, coalition of groups including Environment Colorado and the CoPIRG Foundation delivered over 6,000 petitions and dozens of letters from elected officials to the Public Utilities Commission (PUC), calling on them to reject a proposal by Xcel Energy to scale back their energy savings programs. At stake is $600 million in savings for Xcel’s approximately 1.4 million customers.


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    On Earth Day, coalition of groups including Environment Colorado and the CoPIRG Foundation delivered over 6,000 petitions and dozens of letters from elected officials to the Public Utilities Commission (PUC), calling on them to reject a proposal by Xcel Energy to scale back their energy savings programs. At stake is $600 million in savings for Xcel’s approximately 1.4 million customers.


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    On Earth Day, coalition of groups including Environment Colorado and the CoPIRG Foundation delivered over 6,000 petitions and dozens of letters from elected officials to the Public Utilities Commission (PUC), calling on them to reject a proposal by Xcel Energy to scale back their energy savings programs. At stake is $600 million in savings for Xcel’s approximately 1.4 million customers.


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    Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the largest single source of global warming pollution in America. Environment Colorado enthusiastically applauded the proposed limits, which once finalized will be the largest step the U.S. has taken to combat global warming.


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    Industrial facilities dumped 849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals into Colorado’s waterways in 2012, according to a new report by Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center.

    The “Wasting Our Waterways” report comes as the Environmental Protection Agency considers a new rule to restore Clean Water Act protections to thousands of waterways in Colorado and across the nation.


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  • 06/19/14--07:37: Wasting our Waterways
  • The “Wasting Our Waterways” report shows that industrial facilities dumped millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into America’s waterways. In response, the Environmental Protection Agency is considering a new rule to restore Clean Water Act protections to thousands of waterways across the nation.


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  • 06/23/14--12:42: Driving Cleaner

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    The report, “Driving Cleaner: More Electric Vehicles Mean Less Pollution,” shows that electric vehicles could prevent more than a million metric tons of climate-changing carbon pollution annually in the United States by 2025.


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  • 08/05/14--10:49: New Report: Lighting the Way
  • The report "Lighting the Way" analyzes the strong solar growth seen across the nation, including an 18% increase in Colorado in 2013.  The report emphasizes that it is not availability of sunlight that makes states solar leaders, but the degree to which state and local governments have created effective public policy to help capture the virtually unlimited and pollution-free energy from the sun. 


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    As international leaders prepare for the United Nations Climate Summit next week in New York, a new study shows America’s power plants dump as much carbon pollution into the air any other country’s entire economy except China. Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center pointed to the report as evidence for why the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposal for the nation’s first-ever limits on carbon pollution from power plants is a critical step in the international fight against global warming.


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    Over 11,000 Coloradans, Colorado farmers and businesses, join more than 800,000 Americans and 250 small businesses support restoring Clean Water Act protections to all of the nation's rivers and streams, Environment America said on a key deadline to submit comments.


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  • 11/20/14--09:44: Star Power
  • Executive Summary

    Colorado could meet its energy needs by capturing just a sliver of the virtually limitless and pollution-free energy that strikes the state every day in the form of sunlight. With solar installation costs falling, the efficiency of solar cells rising, and the threats of air pollution and global warming ever-looming, solar power is becoming a more attractive and widespread source of energy every day.

    Solar energy is on the rise across the country.The amount of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity* in the United States has tripled in the past two years. More than half of all new U.S. electricity generating capacity came from solar installations in the first half of 2014, and the United States now has enough solar electric capacity installed to power more than 3.2 million homes. Colorado has been a leader in solar energy adoption, as the state with the eighth most installed solar capacity as of the end of 2013.


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  • 11/20/14--09:44: Star Power
  • Executive Summary

    Colorado could meet its energy needs by capturing just a sliver of the virtually limitless and pollution-free energy that strikes the state every day in the form of sunlight. With solar installation costs falling, the efficiency of solar cells rising, and the threats of air pollution and global warming ever-looming, solar power is becoming a more attractive and widespread source of energy every day.

    Solar energy is on the rise across the country.The amount of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity* in the United States has tripled in the past two years. More than half of all new U.S. electricity generating capacity came from solar installations in the first half of 2014, and the United States now has enough solar electric capacity installed to power more than 3.2 million homes. Colorado has been a leader in solar energy adoption, as the state with the eighth most installed solar capacity as of the end of 2013.


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    Full report here

    Solar power is growing so fast in Colorado that goals once considered ambitious are now seen as readily achievable, according to a new report by Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center.

    “We can get to 20% solar in Colorado by 2025 if we just keep our foot on the accelerator,” said Kim Stevens, Campaign Director of Environment Colorado. “That’s a small fraction of what’s possible, but it will make a big difference in the quality of our lives and the future of our planet.”


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    Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the largest single source of global warming pollution in America. Environment Colorado enthusiastically applauded the proposed limits, which once finalized will be the largest step the U.S. has taken to combat global warming.


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  • 03/26/15--10:37: Shining Cities

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    Link to full report.

    Denver, CO - Denver has more solar per capita than any other major city in the Rocky Mountain region, and ranks 7th nationally according to a new report by Environment Colorado Research and Policy Center. According to the report the solar stature of Denver is owed largely to policies that reduce the costs of going solar.

     “Denver  is a star when it comes to solar power,” said Kim Stevens, Campaign Director of Environment Colorado Research and Policy Center. “The fact is, solar is good for cities, and cities are good for solar.”


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  • 03/31/15--07:28: Dangerous Inheritance
  • As a result of global warming, young Americans today are growing up in a different climate than their parents and grandparents experienced. It is warmer than it used to be. Storms pack more of a punch. Rising seas increasingly flood low-lying land. Large wildfires have grown bigger, more frequent and more expensive to control. People are noticing changes in their own backyards, no matter where they live.


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